Letter to Pastors

Apostolic College of Theology

Apostolic College of Theology

Dear Pastors:

The end time harvest is waiting in the fields now! God is opening doors of opportunity for worldwide Pentecostal ministry as never before. The greatest need is that of laborers. “Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth laborers into his harvest” (Matthew 9:38).

The need, however, is not just for laborers but for qualified laborers, prepared laborers, equipped laborers. Such has always been the criteria for spiritual leadership. When Moses chose men to assist him in leading the Israelites, they had to be “able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness” (Exodus 18:21). It was said of David, the shepherd of Israel, that “he fed them according to the integrity of his heart; and guided them by the skillfulness of his hands” (Psalm 78:72). Daniel and his three Hebrew friends were chosen for special service because they were “skillful in all wisdom, cunning in knowledge, and understanding…such as had ability” (Daniel 1:4). Even the servers of tables in the New Testament church were handpicked on the basis of being “full of faith, and power, wisdom, and of honest report” (Acts 6:3,8).

To assist in the development of such men is the purpose of (AMS) Apostolic Ministerial Studies. In lieu of or in addition to Bible college/seminary training, The Apostolic Ministerial Curriculum was designed to focus on the Word and practical principles of life and ministry in an intense twenty-four class program. Young preachers frequently launch into ministry having little or no basic training in spiritual leadership, people skills, study habits, ministerial ethics, or communication proficiency. The results are unfortunately often predictable.

Many young ministers have large families, excessive debt, or other hindrances that keep them from formal classroom training. How, then, can new ministers receive substantive, basic teaching concerning ministerial precepts? Perhaps The Apostolic Ministerial Studies (AMS) can be at least part of the answer.

AMS offers two levels of training—Basic and Advanced—and are simply called Level I and Level II. All the details and descriptions of the lessons are enclosed in our Academics Page.

AMS is one way we can prepare to meet the challenges of ministry in today’s world, while strengthening the hands of pastors in the process. Working as a team, we can respond in a positive way to the prayer request of Jesus concerning laborers for the harvest.

 

Sincerely,

Apostolic College of Theology

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